Inspiration…and testosterone

Since starting this little blog, I’ve enjoyed finding other bloggers to commiserate with. But in finding bloggy friends, I’ve done my best to avoid blogs of people who were already pregnant. (Exceptions include Vanessa at Yeah Science! – the name of her blog was just too tempting,  and JoJo at An Infertile Road, my very first follower, who got pregnant – on her first IUI! – while I was following her.) I avoided pregnant bloggers because I wanted to shield myself from having to think about pregnant women, a sentiment that Jenny at Dogs Aren’t Kids expressed so well in a recent post.

The problem with this strategy – at least for me – is that it didn’t leave much room for optimism. I loved that there was/is no shortage of support and excellent company in my misery…but I also found myself doubtful that treatment could work for me. I mean, it didn’t seem to have worked for any of my other bloggy friends, so who was I to expect that it would work for me?! (Another problem with this strategy is that it makes me a little bit afraid of actually getting pregnant – like this amazing support system will suddenly vaporize as all my new friends go running for the hills!)

Since my last post, I took advice from Kimberly at No Good Eggs and joined my local Resolve support group. I haven’t been to a meeting yet (the next one is November 19th), but I joined their online forum. On this forum I found inspiration in the form of a Protocol Buddy – someone who followed my weird IVF protocoland had the same baseline AFCand got pregnant! And she writes a blog! I am so encouraged!

Furthermore, this experience gave me the courage to face my fear of pregnant infertility bloggers, and I started reading Jen’s blog, Overworked Ovaries. (Jen’s name and cute avatar kept popping up in the comments section on all my favorite blogs, with hints that her infertility issues might be similar to mine.) I’m about halfway through reading her posts (oldest first), and I find it so exciting to read a story that I know has a happy ending! It’s also great to see that so many of her awesome bloggy friends haven’t abandoned her, but are following along and cheering her on through her pregnancy. And I can’t help but think this is what it’s about! This is what I want!

And I feel hopeful.

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Now, let’s talk about testosterone. But first, the disclaimer:

I am NOT an endocrinologist, or any kind of medical professional! This blog does NOT purport to offer medical advice, medical opinions, or recommendations. Please take this for what it is – the ramblings of an infertile woman trying to make sense of her complicated treatment protocol!

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Last night I applied my final Androderm patch. The night I applied my first patch, I noted first that it is weird looking. C calls it my third nipple.

ImageI wasn’t exactly sure how to apply it, so I checked the website. Clearly they are not marketing to women trying to get pregnant:

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I couldn’t help myself, and decided to check out the website for Estrace cream for comparison:

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I’ll leave it to cleverer folks than me to comment…

Anyway, I waited to write about the testosterone-priming until now, partly because I was hoping dreading expecting to observe some side effects. I observed none. This fact makes me a bit skeptical that this low-dose patch would actually do anything for a 200+ lb man with low sex drive. Then again, that’s not why I am taking it.

And why am I taking it?

From what I can tell, the use of androgens (broad term for male sex hormones including testosterone and DHEA) to treat infertility patients is pretty new, and pretty controversial. Most of the papers I read were written by physicians at the same few clinics. But I think the gist goes like this:

  • Recent studies suggest that Diminished Ovarian Reserve is a condition characterized by the reduced ability to make androgens (including testosterone). This correlation seems to be especially strong in younger DOR patients. (Interestingly, several of the papers contrast DOR with PCOS, a condition characterized by overproduction of androgens…)
  • Testosterone is produced in the ovaries, in ‘theca cells’. Testosterone from the theca cells enters the ‘granulosa cells’, where it is converted to estradiol. (You can read more about estradiol in this post.)Image
  • Granulosa cells are the cells that surround the developing follicles and help prep and develop the eggs for ovulation.

The thought is that in theory [insert head tilt and two-handed gesture] since DOR patients can’t make as much testosterone, supplementation (through a gel or patch, or indirectly by taking DHEA – a testosterone precursor), will stimulate the granulosa cells to do their thing and prep those eggs. This is supposed to “enhance follicle recruitment” (more eggs) and “promote follicle growth and development” (better eggs).

At least a few studies seem to support this theory, showing a greater number of large follicles and better overall pregnancy outcomes for DOR patients treated with androgens (versus untreated DOR patients).

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I start stims (Clomid 100 mg + Menopur 150 IU) tonight, so I guess we’ll see!

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Here goes!

A few weeks ago, after getting the diagnosis of “female infertility” and confronting a variety of painful emotions, a friend of mine suggested that I read her friend’s infertility blog (http://tracysue.wordpress.com/). I did, and it was awesome.

And then, after deciding to move forward with treatment, I felt inspired to write my own little blog… I think a blog will have the benefits of:

  • keeping close family and friends up-to-date without having to tell the same sordid details over and over
  • providing an outlet for my ever growing trove of information-that-I-never-wanted-to-know about infertility
  • serve as a first step in helping me get connected up with the online community of IF-ers like me
  • provide inspiration/consolation/comiseration/some other-ation to someone else struggling with this

Okay, so the last two are probably optimistic, but maybe… Anyway, I’m hoping the benefits will outweigh the costs of this blog – namely, time. (Ahem, that is, time I should be spending prepping lectures, grading, cooking, cleaning up, shopping, reading, hanging out with my dogs and  husband, or countless other things…or so says the little voice in my head.)

Anyway, I’m choosing to ignore the little voice and give it a try. Here goes!