HSG

The HSG took about 5 minutes (excluding time for me to strip from the waist down) and was virtually painless. (I had a few cramps on the drive afterward, but less even than a bad menstrual cramp – not that I ever get bad menstrual cramps…) To the utter bewilderment of my radiologist, I asked to take a photo of the screen. For your viewing pleasure, here’s my uterus and Fallopian tubes:

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I think the fact that you can see the white hair-like projections (my Fallopian tubes) coming out of the white triangle in the middle (my uterus) shows that everything is flowing freely. So plumbing doesn’t appear to be the problem (which we pretty much already knew). Now all I have left for my IUI homework is my injections class next week. Should be fun!

For today’s chemistry lesson, I tried to figure out the likely structure of the dye that they put in my uterus to appear all pretty and white on the x-ray above. I didn’t actually check what they used, but from what I can tell the vast majority of these dyes are small, iodinated organic molecules like the ones shown below. The iodine atoms are the most important part, and are what makes it show up white on the x-ray. There are two classes of iodinated contrast media: ionic (which contain a carboxylic acid group – shown in blue below – somewhere in their structure), and non-ionic (that don’t have a carboxylic acid). For imaging the digestive tract, they often use an inorganic compound – barium sulfate – but I’m going to assume that’s not what they used for my HSG.

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